Posted in Writing challenges

B is before

Before, meaning ‘in front of, in the presence of, in former times’ is akin to a full stop before the sentence has begun. Before then we called it beforan from the German bevor.

Backgrounds make beautiful backdrops for aphorisms; this one from Cicero, scribed and emboldened in the font: Before the Rain
cicero_aphorism_beforeBy the way, am away all week but before then, I’ve scheduled this post!

Joining Frizz  with an aphorism scripted in a font titled to match Tuesday’s:  B challenge

Advertisements

Author:

playing with photography @ eljaygee whilst Tell Tale Therapy has a weakness for words

9 thoughts on “B is before

  1. Perplexed. Do I agree or disagree? Remaining a child is in so many ways a good thing. To ‘know’ can be to be ‘jaded’. Would a child start a war? Maybe! Maybe grown-ups fighting over this and that have taken childhood tantrums into adult life. Still unsure what I think about the quite – while also thinking that knowing our history is crucial. (The ‘our’ referring to ‘us’ in the world; not just of our town or country)

    Like

    1. interesting considerations Lucy but children start wars all the time, and keeping the peace was a parental struggle with my three.
      I do worry also when I hear historical narrative delivered in the present rather than the past tense.

      Like

      1. Laura – wondering what you are meaning re. ‘the present rather than the past tense’ – do you mean people acting now on quarrels which should have been left behind centuries ago? . . . or fiction told in the present tense so the truth is obscured behind anachronisms? or . . .

        Like

        1. narrative of past events told as if happening now, this moment, today. As a psychotherapist I know that this can be a useful method, sparingly used, for people dislocated on the event/feeling conitnuum. Its overuse by such TV historians etc is a denial of the past – or my intelligence to imagine something that happened then and not right now

          Like

Do drop me a line!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s